Custer Lives!

Reno Hill At The Little Big Horn Battlefield

 

In July 2008 I walked the Battle of The Little Big Horn Battlefield for two days. I had every intent to walk in the sequence that the battle unfolded but, like most first time visitors, I went straight to Last Stand Hill. After viewing that most famous portion of the battlefield I proceeded to the portion that Major Marcus Reno and his US 7th Cavalry Troopers engaged the Indians to begin the battle. The land that the Indian camp was on is privately owned and not part of the National Park. It's much easier to photograph it from the access road in the town of Garryowen.

This portion of the battlefield is well marked and easy to walk. I had to dodge a couple of paid tours to take photos and video. I was in no hurry, as I wanted to take in as much of the aura surrounding the battlefield as I could. I'm not going to comment on the battle or officers performance here, I just want to share what I saw and felt. Be sure to make the one dollar donation to get the self guided tour guide that the National Park Service provides. It explains what you are looking at and the significant parts of the battlefield are numbered for ease of discovery. Plus it makes a great souvenir.

If you would like to use one the images on these pages please email me and I'll send you a high resolution large format copy instead of the lower quality images used here.

 

This is where Sitting Bull was camped. This photo was taken outside the Little Big Horn Battlefield. It's privately owned.

The Indian camp site taken from inside Little Big Horn Battlefield.

Major Marcus Reno was routed up these hills by Indians defending their families.

A marker with a map and brief explanation of the Reno defensive position.

 The Major Reno skirmish line took place in the center of this photo.

After the disintegration of the skirmish line, the Troopers next fought in these trees called the 'Timber Fight'.

The Troopers fled across the Little Big Horn and made their defense atop Reno Hill. It was a mad dash with no leadership from Major Reno. This view is from Reno Hill.

The field hospital on Reno Hill was here.

The Indians occupied the terrain below this position.

The path Troopers used to obtain water during the battle. More Medals of Honor were won here than in any other US military operation.

A rifle pit Troopers dug for cover and concealment. There were few shovels and the Troopers used anything they could.

Indian Warrior Long Road fell here. Behind his marker were other Indian firing positions.

Sharpshooter Ridge where Indians fired on the Troopers below.

The monument to the Troopers under Major Reno's command.

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